Sunday, 31 October 2010

Sunday Morning Coffee Extra – More Mark O’Connor

This is only the second time I’ve put on an Extra show and the second time that it features a violinist.  Itzhak Perlman was the first and here we have more Mark O’Connor. [The original show about Mark is here]

There are only two videos, the first being a 10 minute jazz piece and the second an 82 minute video from Mark’s website which is fantastic.  I can’t praise this highly enough.

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Sweet Georgia Brown
Mark O’Connor, Frank Vignola and the Wynton Marsalis Quintet

This didn’t make the show only because I wanted to finish the show with a video of three tunes including this one.

This is where I first came across Wynton Marsalis and he has featured already on Music in the Morning.

_____

 

The second video is taken from a concert in which Mark and the students of Berklee College of Music play a range of music – both traditional and Mark’s own compositions.  Don’t be put off by the fact that it is students playing: they are brilliant.

Remember this is 1h and 22 minutes long but if you like Mark and his music you’ll love this even if it takes you many visits to finish the whole concert.  If I had watched this video in time I would have edited it into manageable pieces. 

Enjoy these magical performances!

 

Did you make it to the end?  Well done!  I told you it was fabulous.

_____

That’s the end now.  I hope you’ve had a great time with Mark and his music.

Until the next time.

Sunday Morning Coffee with Mark O’Connor

After last week’s singalong we return to the normal format today in which I bring you ten music videos I love and you get a big coffee, find a comfy seat, sit back, relax, listen and marvel, hopefully, at Mark’s talent and his music’s beauty. 

Today’s show features the phenomenal fiddler, violinist, guitarist, composer and music teacher Mark O’Connor.

OConnor 1

I hadn’t heard (of) Mark until early this year when I found him in the background of videos of some of the top bluegrass instrumentalists – Jerry Douglas, Sam Bush and Bela Fleck.  I thought he was a run-of-the-mill professional fiddler but I was SO wrong!

In fact, such is the magnificence of his music that, for only the second time, I put on an Extra show – find it here -  featuring Mark’s music.

Now make sure you’ve got your coffee and that you are comfy and the show – which is 50 minutes long - can start with the only vocal in the show – not Mark though.

Sally Ann                                                     with John Cowan

A lively and bouncy number which still shows off Mark’s skills. 

_____

Mark came into this world in 1961 (5 August) in Seattle and soon his musical abilities were obvious. Wikipedia states:

At an early age Mark O'Connor was considered a child prodigy, his first instrument being the guitar. "I was a guitar player first, beginning around age 6." said O'Connor in a recent interview. "At age 11 I got really interested in bluegrass and country guitar, and I was able to really draw inspiration from all the great guitar players that were recording in that era; of course, Chet Atkins, and Jerry Reed, and Doc Watson and some of the bluegrass guitar players like Tony Rice, and Norman Blake."

_____

 

Mark shows off a bit in this encore having played his Violin Concerto with the Brooklyn Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Fiddle Encore:  Impro / Devil’s Dream

Wow!  Sheer virtuosity.

_____

More from Wikipedia now:

As a teenager he won national string instrument championships for his virtuoso playing of the guitar and mandolin as well as on the fiddle. His mentors include Texas old-time fiddler Benny Thomasson who taught O'Connor to fiddle as a teenager, French jazz violinist St├ęphane Grappelli with whom O'Connor toured as a teenager and guitarist Chet Atkins.

Brilliant on three instruments: talent in bucket-loads and put to great use as you’ll see and hear later.

Imagine being good enough to tour with Stephane Grappelli when still a teenager?  What an education!

_____

 

We continue with a great O’Connor composition and three great string players.

Emily’s Reel  with Yo-Yo Ma and Edgar Meyer

I’ve listened to this so often, normally with my eyes closed -but not when driving - and still I am taken by the sound, the togetherness and the joy.

_____

Another biography has this to say about Mark’s early career.

“At the time [1983] O'Connor arrived in Music City [Nashville] (the post-Urban Cowboy era), fiddle was hardly in vogue, and it took a couple of years for him to make his mark. Finally, in 1985 the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band used him in their single "High Horse"; thanks to that work, O'Connor's phone number became a popular one with country record producers. Over the next five years he played on 450 albums, ……... Despite his success, O'Connor gave up session work to concentrate on his own solo career, increasingly rooted in the classical realm thanks to collaborators including Yo-Yo Ma, Wynton Marsalis, and Edgar Meyer.” 

_____

 

O’Connor changes genre – to jazz this time -  as though there were no boundary: there isn’t  …. to him.  He talks about “crossing bridges” from one type of music to another and thus all are linked.

Sweet Suzanne          with John Patitucci and Julian Lage

If you like jazz then you will love this.  If you’re not a jazz lover you may still love this.   I love this!

Julian Lage, who features on this piece, was a soloist in the concert which Mark played with students from Berklee College of Music.  The entire concert is featured in my Extra show.

_____

Mark is an American bluegrass, country and classical fiddler, composer and music teacher. O'Connor's music is wide-ranging, critically acclaimed, and he has received numerous awards for both his playing and his composition. [Wikipedia again]

The Country Music Association named Mark as their Musician of the Year for 6 years in a row  - 1991 to 1996.  I don’t know what happened thereafter: perhaps he wasn’t allowed to enter.

_____

 

Lime Rock                                                   with Edgar Meyer

A duet to end all duets.  As I stumble my way through music – and YouTube – I keep having to remind myself how lucky I am to have found so many musicians of absolutely world-class.  Mark and Edward remind me of that now.

______

That’s half-time and so we’ll have short break to allow you stretch your legs and top up your coffee.  Don’t rush I’ll start when you return and, be assured, there’s much more brilliant playing.

Ready?

Here we go again.

______

 

We start up again with Mark (the bearded one) outstanding on the guitar which was his first instrument but hand problems meant he had to give up on the instrument.  Here we see Mark with great blue-grass musicians.

Slopes                                                   Strength in Numbers

Strength in Numbers are:
Mark O’Connor (beard) – guitar;  Sam Bush  -  mandolin
Bela Fleck  -  banjo;  Jerry Douglas  - dobro
Edgar Meyer  -  double bass

What a guitarist!  One commenter on YouTube remarks on Jerry Douglas’ expressions while Mark is playing

______

Mark’s interests are so wide: folk, bluegrass, classical, jazz as well as arranging and composing.  I have read that his Fiddle Concerto is the most played concerto written in the last 50 years.

In addition to this concerto he has written six violin concertos, string quartets, string trios, choral works and solo unaccompanied works.  Later you’ll hear the 2nd movement from one of his string quartets.

______

 

Good old traditional fiddle-playing now in a performance reported to be at the 1991 Mountain View Arkansas Fiddle Contest.

Lady be Good

Can there be any better?

_____

Mark is also a music teacher but no ordinary teacher.  For more than 16 years Mark has directed his String Camps through which many many children have passed.  Not content with this Mark has launched his own teaching method which is an immersive method – akin to the Suzuki method I think – which uses only American fiddle / violin music.

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We move into classical music and I think you’ll just love this next video: the second movement of Mark’s Third String Quartet.

O’Connor: String Quartet No. 3 Movement 11

Mark O'Connor, Ida Kavafian, Paul Neubauer and Matt Haimovitz II

He is just as much at home here as in the fiddle contest. 

I have no idea about the background to this piece but there is no doubt – to me - that the initial harmony starts to disappear about 2m 54s, two violins are in opposition by 3m 35s and the last 90s feature powerful opposition. I’m probably all wrong and showing off my lack of knowledge but …. it’s what I feel.

Clearly, as a composer, Mark is top-notch.

_____

Tulsa World – a newspaper I imagine - said this about one of Mark’s performances,

You spend the first few moments of a Mark O'Connor performance asking yourself, "How in the world does he DO that?"  After all, there's just one person on stage, holding one fiddle in his two hands.  No wires are visible, other than the four stretched tight over the body of the violin, no electronic crackle can be heard, hinting that there might be pre-recorded rigmarole going on.  And yet, you can't help but wonder from whence comes all that sound.  Maybe what's amazed you is the bagpipe-like sound that runs through "Song of the Liberty Bell," or the bird songs that rise up out of furious melodies of the "Call of the Mockingbird" section from "Fanfare for the Volunteer," or the way his fingers never seem to leave his hand – although that's the only way you can imagine he plays all those notes in his Caprice No.1 in A Major.  But such questions soon fade from mind as O'Connor keeps fiddling away, creating a whole new sort of music that melds country, classical, folk, jazz, and just about anything else he can think of.”

_____

 

Only two tracks to go and this is the only one which is not a live performance.  Again an O’Connor composition and …. just listen.

Appalachia Waltz             with Yo-Yo Ma and Edgar Meyer

Just under 6 minutes of understated brilliance.

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During my current journey into music – since I started this show way back in December last year and “Music in the Morning” in March, I think – I have found musicians who were completely new to me and whose music captured me but I can say, without any hesitation, that Mark has been the most surprising.  I said earlier that I had assumed that he was a good professional fiddler who played with some excellent instrumentalists.  Little did I know that they were playing with a phenomenon.

Mark’s playing talent, the breadth of his musical interests, his composing brilliance and his desire to pass skills on to youngsters show him to be head and shoulders above his contemporaries.

I will continue to be on the look-out for his music.

_____

 

There is nothing understated about this, our last, video which includes three separate tunes and it is a perfect way to sign off this show with the fabulous skills of Mark O’Connor.

Sweet Georgia Brown / Amazing Grace  /  Orange Blossom Special

Orange Blossom Special contains snippets from “Bonanza”, “Meet the Flintstones”, Bach’s “Partita in E” and Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Suite”.

[with The Boston Pops Orchestra conducted by John Williams]

Here for all to see and hear was Mark O’Connor musician extraordinary.  These 10 minutes show why he is held in such high regard but still I am amazed that he isn’t much better known. 

Thank you, Mark, for opening my ears to your brilliance.

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I’m sorry to say that’s this week’s show is over but I’ll be here next week waiting for you to join me for another Sunday Morning Coffee.

See you soon.

Remember the Extra show here.

Saturday, 30 October 2010

Calum at Hallowe’en

Well a day early actually but ….

SDC10207

This is me as I actually am. Grotesque!  

There has been no alteration of the original photo!!!!!??????  No wonder I rarely venture out.

Music in the Morning - Saturday

Two squared this morning!

I'll See You in My Dreams / Imagine  
                                             Mark Knopfler and Chet Atkins

[2 guitarists x 2 songs = 2 squared]

Friday, 29 October 2010

Music in the Morning - Friday

Arcangelo Corelli returns for a second piece. (1st here)

Corelli: Trio sonata "da chiesa" for two violins and basso continuo in A major Op. 3 No. 12

1. Grave - Allegro/Adagio
2. Vivace
3. Allegro
4. Allegro
5. Allegro

Performed by the Purcell Quartet

Thursday, 28 October 2010

Music in the Morning - Thursday

Back for more from Celtic Connections for a lovely Phil Cunningham tune.

Frank McConnell’s Three Step    Celtic Connections

Aly Bain, John McCusker, Bruce Molsky -  fiddle
Phil Cunningham - accordion
Jerry Douglas - dobro
Tim O'Brien - mandolin
Russ Barenberg - guitar
Michael McGoldrick - flute
Todd Parker - bass

I have written lyrics to this tune but they’re under wraps until / unless I find someone willing to and able to sing them.  Could be that I’ll have a long wait.

Wednesday, 27 October 2010

Blog Update

Ten days ago or so I posted about the difficulties I had maintaining this blog and the changes I was going to implement.  I said

“What will remain the same?

Whenever I can I’ll post “Music in the Morning” and “Sunday Morning Coffee”.  At least this will keep a few passing through the doors to see how I am (the blog is).

The same goes for Trafigura.

Occasionally something else - for example poetry - might attract me.

If this is the same what will be different?

I will not post anything personal.

If I have nothing to post I will not go looking.

I will read blogs on Google Reader but visit only rarely and comment less often.

I will not obsess about my paltry stats.”

Thereafter I hit a productive spell of blogging but now I have settled into what I expect will be the on-going pattern: predominantly music posts interspersed with the occasional post on other subjects.

I have noticed that blogging, in general, is in a dip – at least those blogs I read.  There are far fewer posts.  It’s as though blogging has had its day as a mass medium and we are in a phase where numbers drop and only those hardy souls and those who have massive readership keep going. 

I am in neither of those groups  …..  but I hope to keep going.  After about twenty years where music listening wasn’t even a peripheral interest I now find that music is hugely important to me.  I love music, I love finding music I love, I love truly listening to music, I love what music does for me and I love sharing my music. 

As is normal for me I had hoped that my regular music posts - “Music in the Morning” and “Sunday Morning Coffee” – would attract more listeners but there are a small number who listen in most days and every Sunday and a steady stream  find the posts through Google.  I appreciate all who visit.

The point of this post?

I rather wandered, didn’t I?  I meant to say that the last few days blogging is probably how my blog will be for a while and to ask that readers not forget about me.

Music in the Morning - Wednesday

An icon sings only for you.

You Don't Have To Say You Love Me    Dusty Springfield

Tuesday, 26 October 2010

Music in the Morning - Tuesday

Aaaah!  Beautiful.

 

For JL                     Russ Barenberg at Celtic Connections

Monday, 25 October 2010

Music in the Morning - Monday

Vivaldi says, “Good morning”.

Vivaldi: Woodwind Concerto in G Major RV545
Movt. 1/3  Andante molto

Performed by Sonatori de la Gioiosa Marca
Featuring Sergio Azzolini, bassoon & Hans Peter Westermann, oboe

Sunday, 24 October 2010

Trafigura: Does This Presage a Change ?

Trafigura has a new website which makes the gathering of information easier.  Check out www.trafigura.com.

Does this mean that I will find it easier to get information from Trafigura?

Of course not.  I bet the change is skin deep only.

Sunday Morning Coffee: Singalongasunday with the Dubliners

Hello again and welcome to another Sunday Morning Coffee show but today with a difference.  Normally I ask that you get a coffee, sit down and relax but not today.   You have to work.  Well perhaps not work but you need to sing.  Every song is chosen for its singability and to help you I’ve appended the lyrics.  There really is no excuse and I WILL know if you don’t sing.

My children, cats and even my neighbours have complained about the noises breaking out here but you will all be fine because your singing voices are better than mine.

If you want to listen only without the hassle of scrolling past all the lyrics then you can do so by clicking on this link to bring up the YouTube playlist.

Last point before we start.  I’ve put the lyrics into a pdf file which you can view or download here[Apologies the links in the document do not work properly in Acrobat but do in NitroPDF]

Let’s get going because we don’t have time to waste with 10 songs for you. 

Oh there’s still more to say: all the tracks are from the Dubliners and were posted by one person – AndreasSU – many thanks.  Get your coffee, put it somewhere safe, ready yourself, let’s go and raise the roof!

Black Velvet Band

In a neat little town they call Belfast, now apprentice to trade I was bound
And its many an hours sweet happiness, have I spent in that neat little town
Til a sad misfortune came over me, which caused me to stray from the land
Far away from me friends and relations, betrayed by the black velvet band

Her eyes they shone like diamonds
I thought her the queen of the land
And her hair it hung over her shoulder
Tied up with a black velvet band

I took a stroll with this pretty fair maid, and a gentleman passing us by
I knew she meant the undoing of me, by the look in her roguish black eye
Well a gold watch she took from his pocket and she placed it right in to my hand
And the very first thing that I thought was bad luck to the black velvet band

Her eyes they shone like diamonds
I thought her the queen of the land
And her hair it hung over her shoulder
Tied up with a black velvet band

Now before a judge and a jury, next morning I had to appear
O the judge he says to me: "Young man, your case it is proven clear
We'll give you seven years penal servitude, to be spent faraway from the land
Far away from your friends and relations, betrayed by the black velvet band"

Her eyes they shone like diamonds
I thought her the queen of the land
And her hair it hung over her shoulder
Tied up with a black velvet band

So come all you jolly young fellows a warning take by me
When you are out on the town me lads, beware of them pretty colleens
For they'll feed you with strong ale, "Ma Yah", 'til you are unable to stand
And the very first thing that you'll know, me lads, is you've landed in Van Diemens Land

Her eyes they shone like diamonds
I thought her the queen of the land
And her hair it hung over her shoulder
Tied up with a black velvet band

_____

 

Wild Rover

I've been a wild rover for many the year
And I've spent all me money on whiskey and beer,
But now I'm returning with gold in great store
And I never will play the wild rover no more.

And it's no, nay, never,
No nay never no more,
Will I play the wild rover
No never no more.

I partook to an ale-house I used to frequent
I told the landlady my money's all spent.
I asked her for credit, she answered me "nay
Such a custom like yours I could have any day."

And it's no, nay, never,
No nay never no more,
Will I play the wild rover
No never no more.

I took out of my pocket ten sovereigns bright
And the landlady's eyes opened wide with delight.
She said "I have whiskey and wine of the best
And the words that I told ye were only in jest."

And it's no, nay, never,
No nay never no more,
Will I play the wild rover
No never no more.

I'll go home to my parents, confess what I've done
I'll ask them to pardon the prodigal son.
And if they caress me as oft times before
I swear I will play the wild rover no more.

And it's no, nay, never,
No nay never no more,
Will I play the wild rover
No never no more.

And it's no, nay, never,
No nay never no more,
Will I play the wild rover
No never no more.

And it's no, nay, never,
No nay never no more,
Will I play the wild rover
No never no more.

_____

 

 Molly Malone

In Dublin's fair city
Where the girls are so pretty
I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone
As she wheeled her wheel barrow
Through the streets broad and narrow
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

Alive, alive ho', alive, alive ho'
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

She was a fishmonger
And sure 'twas no wonder
So were her father and mother before
And they both wheeled their barrows
Through streets broad and narrow
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

Alive, alive ho', alive, alive ho'
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

She died of a fever
And no one could save her
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone
Now her ghost wheels her barrow
Through the streets broad and narrow
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

Alive, alive ho', alive, alive ho'
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

Alive, alive ho', alive, alive ho'
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

Alive, alive ho', alive, alive ho'
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

Alive, alive ho', alive, alive ho'
Crying 'Cockles and mussels alive, alive ho'

_____

 

 Leaving of Liverpool

Fare thee well to you my own true love,
I am sailing far, far away,
I am bound for California,
And I know that I'll return some day.

So fare thee well my own true love,
And when I return united we will be,
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me,
But my darling when I think of thee.

I have sailed on a Yankee sailing ship
Davey Crockett is her name,
And Burgess is the captain of her,
And they say that she's a floating hell.

So fare thee well my own true love,
And when I return united we will be,
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me,
But my darling when I think of thee.

I have sailed with Burgess once before,
He's a man I know right well,
If a man's a sailor then he will get along,
If not then he's sure in hell.

So fare thee well my own true love,
And when I return united we will be,
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me,
But my darling when I think of thee.

Now the sun shines on the harbour, love,
I wish I could remain,
For I know it be a long,long time,
'Til I see you again.

So fare thee well my own true love,
And when I return united we will be,
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me,
But my darling when I think of thee.

So fare thee well my own true love,
And when I return united we will be,
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me,
But my darling when I think of thee.
But my darling when I think of thee.

_____

 

Fields of Athenry

By a lonely prison wall,
I heard a young girl calling
Michael they have taken you away,
For you stole Trevelyn's corn
So the young might see the morn,
Now a prison ship lies waiting in the bay

Low lie, The Fields Of Athenry
Where once we watched the small free birds fly
Our love was on the wing
We had dreams and songs to sing,
It's so lonely round the Fields of Athenry

By a lonely prison wall
I heard a young man calling
'Nothing matters Mary, when you're free'
Against the famine and the crown,
I rebelled, they cut me down
Now you must raise our child with dignity

Low lie, The Fields Of Athenry
Where once we watched the small free birds fly
Our love was on the wing
We had dreams and songs to sing,
It's so lonely round the Fields of Athenry 

By a lonely harbour wall
She watched the last star falling
As the prison ship sailed out against the sky
For she lived in hope and pray
For her love in Bot'ny Bay
Its so lonely round the Fields Of Athenry

Low lie, The Fields Of Athenry
Where once we watched the small free birds fly
Our love was on the wing
We had dreams and songs to sing,
It's so lonely round the Fields of Athenry

Low lie, The Fields Of Athenry
Where once we watched the small free birds fly
Our love was on the wing
We had dreams and songs to sing,
It's so lonely round the Fields of Athenry

_____

 

Spanish Lady

As I roved out through Dublin City
At the hour of twelve at night
Who should I see but a Spanish lady
Washing her feet by candlelight
First she washed them then she dried them
Over a fire of ambry coals
In all my life I ne'er did see
A maid so sweet about the soles

Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay
Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay

I stopped to look but the watchman passed
Says he, "Young fellow, the night is late.
"Off with you now or I will wrestle you
"Straight way through the Bridewell gate."
Threw a look to the Spanish lady
Hot as the fire of ambry coals
In all my life I ne'er did see
A maid so sweet about the soles.

Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay
Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay

As I rolled back to Dublin City
Just before the dark was o'er
Who should I see but the Spanish lady
When I was weary and footsore
I got the look from the Spanish lady
Hot as the fire of ambry coals
In all my life I ne'er did see
A maid so sweet about the soles

Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay
Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay

I've wondered north and I've wondered south
Through Stoney Batter and Patrick's Close
Up and around by the Gloucester Diamond
And back by Napper Tandy's house
Old age has laid her hands upon me
Cold as a fire of ashy coals
In all my life I ne'er did see
A maid so sweet about the soles

Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay
Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay

Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay
Whack fol a too ra loo ra laddy
Whack fol a too ra loo ra lay

_____

 

 Irish Rover

On the Fourth of July 1806 we set sail from the sweet cove of Cork
We were sailing away with a cargo of bricks for the grand City Hall in New York
'twas a wonderful craft, she was rigged fore and aft and oh, how the wild wind drove her
She stood several blasts, she had twenty-seven masts and they called her the Irish Rover

We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags, we had two million barrels of stone
We had three million sides of old blind horses hides, we had four million barrels of bones
There were five million dogs, six million hogs and, seven million barrels of porter
There were nine million bails of old nanny-goats' tails all on board of the Irish Rover

There was awl Mickey Coote who played hard on his flute when the ladies lined up for a set
He was tootlin' with skill for each sparkling quadrille, though the dancers were fluther'd and bet
With his smart witty talk, he was cock of the walk and he rolled the dames under and over
They all knew at a glance when he took up his stance that he sailed in the Irish Rover

We had Barney McGee from the banks of the Lee, there was Hogan from County Tyrone
There was Micky McGurk who was scared stiff of work and a man from Westmeath called Malone
There was Slugger O'Toole who was drunk as a rule and Fighting Bill Treacy from Dover
And your man, Mick McCann from the banks of the Bann all on board of the Irish Rover

We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out and the ship lost it's way in the fog
And that whale of a crew was reduced down to two, just meself and the Captain's old dog
Then the ship struck a rock, Oh Lord! what a shock, the bulkhead was turned right over
Turned nine times around and the poor old dog was drowned, I'm the last of the Irish Rover

_____

Dicey Reilly

Oh poor old Dicey Reilly she has taken to the sup.
Oh poor old Dicey Reilly she will never give it up.
For it's off each morning to the pop,
And then she's in for another little drop,
And the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly.

Poor old Dicey Reilly she has taken to the sup.
Poor old Dicey Reilly she will never give it up.
It's off each morning to the pop,
And then she's in for another little drop,
For the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly.

Oh she walks along Fitzgibbon street with an independent air,
And then it's down be Summerhill and as the people stare
She says it's nearly half past one, and it's time I had another little one
Oh the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly

Poor old Dicey Reilly she has taken to the sup.
Poor old Dicey Reilly she will never give it up.
It's off each morning to the pop,
And then she's in for another little drop,
For the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly.

Oh long years ago when men were men and fancied May Oblong
Or lovely Beckie Cooper or Maggie's Mary Wong,
One woman put them all to shame, just one was worthy of the name,
And the name of that dame was Dicey Reilly

Poor old Dicey Reilly she has taken to the sup.
Poor old Dicey Reilly she will never give it up.
It's off each morning to the pop,
And then she's in for another little drop,
For the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly.

Oh but time went catching up with her like many pretty whores,
And it`s after you along the street before you`re out the doors,
Their looks all fade, and the balance weighed ah but out of all that great brigade,
Still the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly

Poor old Dicey Reilly she has taken to the sup.
Poor old Dicey Reilly she will never give it up.
It's off each morning to the pop,
And then she's in for another little drop,
For the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly.

Poor old Dicey Reilly she has taken to the sup.
Poor old Dicey Reilly she will never give it up.
It's off each morning to the pop,
And then she's in for another little drop,
For the heart of the rowl was Dicey Reilly.

_____

All for Me Grog

I'm sick in the head cos I haven't been to bed,                        
Since first I came ashore with me plunder.
I've seen centipedes and snakes, me head is full of aches,
And I think I'll take a path for way out yonder.

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog,                           
All for me beer and tobacco,          
I spent all me tin with the ladies drinkin' gin,          
Far across the western ocean I must wander.

Where are me boots, me noggin' noggin'  boots,                 
They're all sold for beer and tobacco.
For the soles, they got more thin and the uppers were lettin' in,       
And me feet were looking out for better weather. 

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog,       
All for me beer and tobacco,          
I spent all me tin with the ladies drinkin' gin,              
Far across the western ocean I must wander.

Now where is me shirt, me noggin' noggin' shirt,                           
It's all sold for beer and tobacco.              
For the sleeves they got worn out and the collar turned inside out      And the tail is looking out for better weather.

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog,           
All for me beer and tobacco,          
I spent all me tin with the ladies drinkin' gin,          
Far across the western ocean I must wander.

Where is me bed, me noggin' noggin' bed,               
It's all sold for beer and tobacco.                      
For the sheets they got  all worn  the mattress got all torn
And the springs are looking out for better weather.

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog,                   
All for me beer and tobacco,           
Well, I spent all me tin with the ladies drinkin' gin,            
Far across the western ocean I must wander.

Where is me wife, me noggin' noggin' wife,                       
She's all sold for beer and tobacco.                          
Her front it got wore out her arse was kicked about,                              
And I hope she's looking out for better weather.

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog,               
All for me beer and tobacco,           
well, I spent all me tin with the ladies drinkin' gin,                     
Far across the western ocean I must wander.

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog,                   
All for me beer and tobacco,           
Well, I spent all me tin with the ladies drinkin' gin,            
Far across the western ocean I must wander.

_____

 

Whiskey in the Jar

As I was a goin' over the far famed Kerry mountains
I met with captain Farrell and his money he was counting
I first produced me pistol and I then produced me rapier
Saying "Stand and deliver" for he were a bold deceiver

musha ring dumma do damma da
whack for the daddy 'ol
whack for the daddy 'ol
there's whiskey in the jar

I went up to my chamber, all for to take a slumber
I'd silver, gold and jewels and sure it was no wonder
Jenny took me pistol, she filled it up with water
Then sent for captain Farrell to be ready for the slaughter

musha ring dumma do damma da
whack for the daddy 'ol
whack for the daddy 'ol
there's whiskey in the jar

Early in the morning, just before I rose to travel
Up comes a band of troopers and likewise captain Farrell
I first produced me pistol for me rapier she had stolen
I couldn't shoot the water, and a prisoner I was taken

musha ring dumma do damma da
whack for the daddy 'ol
whack for the daddy 'ol
there's whiskey in the jar

If there's anyone can aid me 'tis my brother in the army
If I can find his station in Cork or in Killarney
If he'll go with me, we'll go rovin' in Killkenny
And I'm sure he'll treat me better than me sly deceivin' Jenny

musha ring dumma do damma da
whack for the daddy 'ol
whack for the daddy 'ol
there's whiskey in the jar

There's some take delight in the carriages a rolling
and others take delight in the hurling and the bowling
But I take delight in the juice of the barley
and courting pretty fair maids in the morning bright and early

musha ring dumma do damma da
whack for the daddy 'ol
whack for the daddy 'ol
there's whiskey in the jar

musha ring dumma do damma da
whack for the daddy 'ol
whack for the daddy 'ol
there's whiskey in the jar

_____

 

That’s all, folks.  A great singalong, coffee and no comments from me, what more could you ask for?  That I’ll be here next week.  OK, I’ll turn up again.

Drop by next week if you want, I’ll be here with some more music.

Saturday, 23 October 2010

Music in the Morning - Saturday

Apologies: got the day wrong.  Called the day “Thursday” instead of “Saturday”.

Haydn and Wynton Marsalis team up today for your enjoyment.

Haydn: Concerto for Trumpet in Eb & Orchestra -  Mov 2
                                                                      Wynton
Marsalis

Friday, 22 October 2010

Clegg Shocks Nadine Dorries !

Yesterday I posted a pic of Clegg and Dorries with some fun dialogue – well I thought it was funny!

Given that Dorries has flipped her fiction to fact ratio the dialogue must be altered.

Clegg1Dorries1

Nadine:  Nick, you’re big but you’re telling fibs.
Nick:     70% fiction / 30% fact, 70% fact / 30% fiction, Nadine:  Well fuck me, Nick!

Music in the Morning - Friday

The days a wreck before you start – sorry!

Wreck of the Day                                                 Anna Nalick

Thursday, 21 October 2010

Nick Clegg and Nadine Dorries

Are Nick and Nadine related?  Are they lovers?

Nad has already admitted that 70% of her blog is fiction (i.e. lies) and the longer the ToLi’s are in power the more we see that Clegg’s utterances during the election were fiction too.

Nick and Nad are so alike in that one way: truth is unimportant.

Nick and Nad, you need to tell us.  What is going on?

But, whatever you say, how can we believe you?

_______________

 

Clegg1 Dorries1

Nadine:  Nick, you’re big but you’re telling fibs.
Nick:     70% fiction / 30% fact, Nadine 

Nadine Dorries: Fact or Fiction

I think I’m correct in saying that Nadine Dorries is a fact: she exists.  It’s hard to be sure though because she has admitted to the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards that:

“My blog is 70% fiction and 30% fact. It is written as a tool to enable my constituents to know me better and to reassure them of my commitment to Mid Bedfordshire. I rely heavily on poetic licence and frequently replace one place name/event/fact with another.”

[For the background to this reads Tim Ireland at Bloggerheads.]

Given the 70:30 fiction: fact ratio on her blog – she admits to blogging mainly fiction -  I wonder how much of this post is true.

Cleared


Posted Thursday, 21 October 2010 at 16:12


After a fifteen month ordeal, it was a delighted for my family to have been cleared by the standards commissioner today.

Everyone is getting very excited about my comments regarding my blog. Not that it had anything to do with the complaint lodged by the BNP.
My blog conceals IDs, times, dates, and is often out of synch.

This is because I have had more than my fair share of inappropriate attention to deal with
For example - when I do blog exactly where I am going to be - we find ourselves having to deal with some very strange and un invited people.

I suppose if any of my blog were truly fiction, I could call myself a journalist.

The fiction, in terms of locations etc, is done to protect my family and staff.

Losing Poem 3

My three entries in the Glasgow Herald Scots poetry competition came, unsurprisingly, nowhere and so now I dump my failures on you.  The first two poems are published here.

Weel-kent Stranger

Ah seen a man above the loch
A-walkin' on his ain.
I thocht I kent him weel
Nae idea what he's daein'.

 

Ah left ma sheep wi' ma three dugs
An' set aff up yon hill
Ah couldna' see him noo
Ah hoped he'd be there still

 

Ah fund him walkin' by the burn
Ne'er seen a man sae strange
Tall, thin, an' dark an' pale an' a'
Ah kent ma life had changed

 

“Aw, Joack”, he says tae me sae soft
“This is ma joab, you see.
Ye've one day left to dae yur best
An' then ye'll come wi' me.”

 

“Ah'm oan ma oan, nae family.
Hunner sheep an' ma dugs three.”
"Gae feed them, say cheerio.
We'll gang early you an' me."

Losing Poems 1 and 2

In June I submitted three poems to The Glasgow Herald’s Scots Poetry Competition.  Unsurprisingly I came nowhere but the act of entering was huge for me. 

Below are my first two poems – they are linked.  The third poem is posted here.

Ah Hae Tae Write

Ah need tae get ma poem heid on richt the day
Fur a poem o' twenny lines ah'll need so they say
In Scot's or the like we aye hae to stickit
Nae mistakes at a' just class or they'll nae pick it

Yon Glesga Herald's goan an' pit up a prize
If ah won, ye ken, wouldna be ony surprise
Fur ah'm yin of the best wae words and things
Mony hae said afore, "Wi' words ye mak em sing"

Noo ah'm no a big heid tho' many wull wunner
Hoo yin who a' ither penners will scunner
Widna be foo o' himself wi a' his skills
Insteed has tae tak thae anti-depressant pills

Weel life's a struggle as aye it's been, that's true
Ma coat o' many colours has aye been blue
Dinna worry, dinna fluster, ah'll be owre this soon
Wi' pencil an' paper I'll write my thochts doon

__________

I made the mistake of putting this poem on my blog before I reads that poems must not have been published before entering.  I didn’t really think that putting it on my blog would rule it out but I wrote about that scenario.  hence Poem number 2

 

Ah Hae Tae Write Mair

Fool, fool, mair words I hae to pen the noo.
Ma first go ah pit on ma blog. Ah'd nae clue
That ony sicht in public was a' ruled oot.
They'd pu' it frae the fecht o' that ah've nae doot.

Ah'll ne'er write yin as bonny as that agin
Story o' ma life: lost and lost, it's a' a sin
A bit o' winning, ye ken, is a' ah ask
Nae success but losin' in this aye ah bask

But whaur, whaur will ah find ma inspiration?
Ootside? In ma heid? There's aye desperation
Fur ah ken masel sae weel ah'll nae succeed
But try, ah'll keep goin', till a' ma pencils bleed

 

“Gie up, gie up fur ye'll nae hae a chance
They professionals will lead ye a wordsmith's dance”
“Nae! Gie up? Nae way! Ah'm here tae the
finish.
Ma words wull stand and ne'er diminish.”

__________

Music in the Morning - Thursday

You’re taken on a visit to Nathaniel Gow’s beautiful Coilsfield House but don’t worry in 4 mins you’ll be home.

Coilsfield House                                                             Ossian

Wednesday, 20 October 2010

Gideon and Blood

This is a photo after Gideon sat down in the Commons today.

Gideon

Sated on the lifeblood of our economy and public services, he enjoys the applause from his colleagues on the dark side.

“Our work is never done.  Wherever there is blood we shall have it!”

Music in the Morning - Wednesday

Two sopranos today.

Gasparini: Stabat Mater for two sopranos, strings and basso continuo
Movements 8&9 of 9: 8 - Quando Corpus; 9 - Amen

Performed by Stradivaria
Featuring Isabelle Desrochers, Isabelle Poulenard, sopranos
Directed by Daniel Poulenard

Tuesday, 19 October 2010

Deficit Letter: Diageo’s Walsh Revealed

One of the signatories to Lord Wolfson’s letter is Tory-supporting Paul Walsh, Chief Executive of Diageo  - the drinks company with Johnnie Walker, Gordons, Smirnoff, Bells and Guinness in its stable.

By all accounts Walsh has had a successful 10 years in charge but should we listen to his advice on handling the deficit?

I’ll let you decide.

Walsh has presided over the closure of the Diageo bottling plant in Kilmarnock – the home of Johnnie Walker – with the loss of 900 jobs.  That 400 new jobs are being created in Fife doesn’t counter-balance the massive impact in Ayrshire.

Plant closures like this are, unfortunately, common across the UK but Walsh goes way beyond this.

Should we listen to him?

But there’s more ….

Diageo has reduced its UK corporation tax bill by an estimated £100 million pounds per year by ….. legal means.

The Guardian of Feb 2009 states:

… it is possible to unearth some of the facts in the obscure filings of a network of Dutch subsidiaries created in the last few years. Diageo has managed to use these Dutch structures to transfer billions of pounds worth of its businesses out of the UK, on paper at any rate.

The legal ownership of many famous trademarks has been transferred, including Johnnie Walker scotch, J & B Rare, and Gilbey's gin - brands worth hundreds of millions of pounds.

Along with the brands has gone the ownership of the entire whisky businesses, leaving Scotland's distilleries as hollowed-out sub-contractors.

We have traced Johnnie Walker and J& B operations vested in a Dutch central entity, Diageo Brands BV in Amsterdam. There is no sign in the accounts that Diageo paid UK capital gains tax on the profits when the Dutch entity purchased these hugely valuable operations.

Revenue sources say that the Netherlands will normally give tax relief to a subsidiary for the full value of all the business it has brought into the country. So, according to the records, the Johnnie Walker profits stacked up in the Netherlands following the move, virtually tax-free. But British tax authorities have lost a major source of revenue.”

£100 million pounds in lost revenue!

It’s legal, of course, but ….. it stinks.

Should we listen to Walsh?

But he’s not finished yet.

In February 2010 Diageo (or rather Walsh) said, according to the Guardian:

“Diageo, the world's biggest spirits group and owner of drinks brands such as Guinness and Smirnoff, has stepped up the pressure on government to cut personal and corporate taxes by warning that the company may leave Britain for a more business-friendly environment.”

I earn £3.6million pounds but tax me too harshly and I’ll take my ball away to Switzerland  or some such place.

Poor wee lamb!  £3.6 million not enough?   I want more!

Who does Walsh think he is?  When he puts up two fingers to HMRC and to the government he’s putting up two fingers to all of us.  The arrogant so-and-so.

And we should listen to him and his cronies?

 

Cut now!  Cut hard!  There is no alternative!   Many will suffer hardship but that doesn’t matter to you.  No compassion.  Just as long as your tax bill isn’t increased.

You and your kind make me sick!