Tuesday, 11 March 2014

Strange! Economic Credibility

 

The Telegraph states that Alex Salmond’s economic credibility has been undermined. 

Telegraph 20140311 A

The Telegraph continues

Telegraph 20140311 C

The Treasury’s analysis is based upon the OBR’s prediction of gas/oil revenues.  Is the Treasury correct?  I don’t know.  We must remember this Treasury report is based on a prediction and I think the OBR’s record of accuracy is not particularly good although I accept it may be correct this time.

 

Alistair Carmichael goes to town

Telegraph 20140311 B

 

But just last Friday papers were reporting

Guardian 20140311 A

 

What did Mr Carmichael say about his Chancellor’s performance?

Telegraph Blank

 

What was the Telegraph’s headline?

Telegraph Blank

 

Carmichael kept his mouth shut and the Telegraph didn’t carry the story.

 

Strange!

9 comments:

  1. I received my Vote Yes "newspaper" yesterday and it did make me laugh out loud (sorry). I am being promised a land of milk and honey (and whisky) with a much richer country, a bigger pension, a more generous welfare system, a better health service, better transport, etc... etc... and in summary everything will be brilliantly better and wonderful in every possible way and all problems will disappear, the EU will accept us into membership willingly with open arms without us having to adopt the Euro and the Bank of England will willingly join in a currency union with our nation that has just chosen to leave the rest of the UK. Oh goody. What else could possibly be needed to win me over? And yet... here I still sit, looking over the awkward landscape on each side of the fence. That childish "newspaper" has pushed me a little in the opposite direction from where it was intended to push me.

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  2. When independent Scotland will not be a 'land of milk and honey' but it will be our country run by us and for us but nor will it be the land the daily dire warnings claim.

    There is little, if any, evidence to suggest that countries which obtain their independence regret the decision. I have no doubt that, in 50 years long after we have departed this earth, no one will question the wisdom of the decision made in 2014 to reclaim our independence.

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  3. Perhaps Calum, but they have got themselves into a dreadful mess about the currency options, by saying they are open to no options other than one that looks a) unlikely and b) certainly not like independence. If they go into September sticking to what they are saying now I will be astonished if they win (but I have been astonished before in this life). I watch with interest. (While also keeping an eye on the moves for Shetland independence and/or unification with Norway, for that rumbles on unreported, by contacts in Shetland tell me. They have a lot of oil beneath their waters).

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  4. It's strange how unionists do not want to lose Scotland from the Union but are happy to talk up the possibility of an independent Scotland losing the Shetlands.

    Would they be happy to see the Shetlands go if Scotland rejects independence? No need to answer.

    Fear-mongering on top of fear-mongering is the order of every day.

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  5. Well I am not a "Unionist", and your response does not address the issue that is a real issue. The current Scottish government have seemingly done everything they can to dissuade me from voting Yes, having been rather inclined to do so a few years ago. I am being dissuaded by their words and actions, not by those of the No camp. But I remain uncommitted, meantime, observing and thinking.

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  6. And the Shetland issue is an issue regardless of the September result, because the current vote in Scotland has certainly got them thinking up there. However... my prediction is that the result in September will be No (whatever way little me votes) and the Shetlanders will stay in the UK too, and in any eventual UK referendum the still United Kingdom will stay in the EU. Business as usual, in other words. Time will tell how much if any of that is correct.

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  7. I never said you were a unionist but you raised the issue of Shetland departing.

    As regards your real issue, I don't believe the Scottish government had you in mind when they wrote their literature.

    With both both pro and anti-independence literature, comments and claims we have to do our best to get underneath the words. One may chime more than the other. Then you may be able to move off the fence.

    I suspect tho' that your bum will be very sore from sitting on the fence so long.

    I suspect also that when you do move it will be to the other side from me. But the decision is yours.

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  8. Salmond started to push me away with the following moves:
    1) The naive notion that the other nations of the EU might embrace Scotland as a separate EU member without it adopting the Euro. 2) The idea that as an independent nation we should share a currency union with another nation with ten times our population and that therefore gets to dominate our economic policy to a considerable degree - what sort of "independence" is that?! 3) His retreat from the previous position of complete disengagement of Scottish armed forces from the rUK army and its daft and immoral interventions in lands far away, although he's gone quiet on that recently and may have back-tracked a bit. 4) His proposal that we should still have the rump of the UK's monarchy as our monarchy, when what we need is a free republic. True and complete independence, with no monarchy, albeit within the EU and therefore inevitably with the euro as currency and surrendering as much sovereignty as every other EU member, with defence forces used only for defence (ie to resist invasion) would greatly tempt me, but the mess that is currently proposed does not tempt me much at all, although of course Salmond and his lot may soon be kicked from office not long after his form of "independence", so all could change. Nationalism in itself seems no reason for independence to me, for it is a nasty instinct and I have more in common with the people of Newcastle, fr example, than with those of Orkney or the Western isles. Anyway, I shall leave the debate here now and await the result with great interest and as yet no set view on which result I hope for.

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  9. I heard (YouTube) Tommy Sheridan tell the story of a friend who wanted Scotland to be a socialist republic but who was going to vote 'No' because that was not what was on offer. I detect a sense of that in your view. You rightly identify that an independent Scotland would develop over the years (and years). The Scotland that is on offer does not match my desires but it is a step in the right direction. Without a 'Yes' vote there can be no moves in the right direction.

    " Nationalism in itself seems no reason for independence to me"
    Nationalism is used as a stick with which to beat those who seek independence but that stick can be used to beat unionist politicians who talk about the greatness of our united kingdom. Much is made of the UK's power and that this is a reason to remain united. I'm sorry this kind of nationalism I can do without. But a nationalism which wants the ability for a people (especially when it is geographically based rather than on the basis of birth or ethnicity) to make its own decisions is a much preferable nationalism.

    You're always welcome to come back and discuss the issues .... as long as I am active.

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